The spark that has triggered rebellion

September 12th, 2009

‘I’m as Mad as Hell, and I’m Not Gonna Take This Anymore!’ This sentiment is being voiced by protesters turning out for Tea Parties and Health Care Town Hall Meetings around the country. People are angry and frightened by the prospect of government running their health care system, but their anger goes far beyond a 1000 page health bill.

Ellen Sauerbrey
American Thinker
September 12, 2009

featured stories   The spark that has triggered rebellion
featured stories   The spark that has triggered rebellion

Health care reform is merely the spark that has touched off a prairie fire of grassroots rebellion among a people who believe their representatives do not represent them, do not listen to them and do not care what they think. Many Americans feel that they are losing control of their financial well being, their values and their culture. Shell shock set in as they tried to absorb the rapidity of drastic change.

The first stirring of protest came with the Tea Parties in the spring. These gatherings were completely misread by a media that ignored them and dismissed the attendees as right wing kooks. The Tea Parties were about taxes, yes. But far more they were about the rapid intrusion of the federal government into private affairs, about deficit spending, and a growing understanding that America was heading down a very dangerous road.

People see a government in Washington that is in the process of destroying the constitutional principles of limited government and maximum personal freedom that made America the freest and most prosperous country the world has ever known.

James Madison, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson must be turning over in their graves at what is being done to the Republic they founded. At the close of Constitutional Convention in 1787, Benjamin Franklin said we gave you “a republic if you can keep it.” At the moment, keeping it does not look promising.

Our founding fathers had an incredible understanding of human nature, and of the natural tendency of governments to become oppressive. They gave us a unique Constitution that attempted to limit the power of government and ensure the rights of individuals. In 1798 Thomas Jefferson wrote, “In questions of power, then let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution.”

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