Keiser Report: Printing money, chopping down trees

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Rio de Janeiro, Max and Stacy note the acceleration of the rainforest being chopped down into the last months of the year. At the same time, out of control money printing from the Fed is sending stock markets to all time new highs. In the second half, Max continues his interview with private equity investor and former banker, Robert Wilson, who has lived in Brazil for over twenty years. They discuss the more sound economic arguments for maintaining the Amazon than chopping it down for timber. The nature of the rainforest makes it for more rational to keep it for the long term intellectual property prospects to be found in the unique flora and fauna of the region. They also discuss China’s important trade relationship with Brazil and about the need for greater immigration into the country.
See Also: (Max Keiser) – Keiser Report: Will Brazil’s Economic Stars Align in 2020?

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Rio de Janeiro, Max and Stacy ask whether or not Brazil’s economic stars will finally align in 2020. After several years in which the economy has struggled to grow more than 1% per year, could low interest rates and even lower inflation rates finally spark those ‘animal spirits’ recently missing in the economy? In the second half, Max talks to private equity investor and former banker, Robert Wilson, who has lived in Brazil for over twenty years. He and Max discuss the infrastructure spend required to bring Brazil up to developed world standards and look at the investment boom absent despite the low interest rates. They compare and contrast the various states of Brazil and how they add to the overall GDP of the economy. Also: (Max Keiser) – Keiser Report: A very Keiser Christmas

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Buenos Aires, Max and Stacy celebrate Christmas Eve with a look back at the biggest stories and trends of 2019. Deglobalization and Deglobalization roared ahead in the year as central banks started stockpiling and repatriating gold. It was also a year that was almost the opposite of 2018 in that going long almost anything performed well: from stocks to bonds to commodities. They also discuss the end of year ‘repo-shock’ as 2020 looks set for yet another turn in the roller coaster of a global financial system saturated with debt. They also look at the ‘geo-economics’ of deglobalization as the US retreats and China advances and at the GIABO of uprisings against the turmoil accompanying this transition. Also: (Max Keiser) – Keiser Report: A Grains ‘Superhighway’ in Argentina?

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Buenos Aires, Max and Stacy look at some of the options on the horizon for Argentina as the new government settles in and tries to revive the economy. They discuss the grains ‘superhighway’ that may end up being built by China as they seek to dredge the Parana River to make way for bulk vessels. They also talk about the statements from Total about the unlikelihood of developing any natural gas from the shale reserves in Patagonia in light of ‘negative prices’ in the US. In the second half, Max interviews Frederico Ast about building ‘the justice system of the future’ with a dispute resolution system for a globalized online world. Also: (Max Keiser) – Keiser Report: Central Banks Will Push Gold Higher in 2020

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Max and Stacy discuss the many root causes of the frequent economic and monetary crises in Argentina. In the second half, Max continues his interview with Nick Giambruno of CaseyResearch.com about the economy of Argentina. They also discuss his recent piece arguing that central banks will push gold prices higher in 2020 as they continue to take physical delivery of the precious metal with record demand. Also: (Max Keiser) – Keiser Report in Buenos Aires

In this episode of the Keiser Report from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Max and Stacy discuss the pile of impossible to pay IMF debts left behind by the Macri administration. They also look at Trump’s bizarre tariffs on Argentina for an allegedly intentional ‘currency devaluation,’ despite the fact that the government of Argentina blew through $22 billion trying to support the peso. In the second half, Max interviews Nick Giambruno of CaseyResearch.com about the relative calm in Buenos Aires among the population despite the ongoing currency and debt crisis. Nick says the population is used to such a crisis every decade and, so, they are anti-fragile and prepared.