Coups R US: American regime changes and their aftermaths, from Hawaii to Libya

In March of 1951, Jacobo Arbenz came to power in Guatemala after having been resoundingly elected by the people. A little more than three years later, he was forced to resign in the midst of armed intervention. His reforms to redistribute unused land to poor peasants had fallen afoul of the United Fruit Company, which owned and warehoused vast tracts of Guatemalan land. The American corporation solicited the US government to overthrow the populist president and the Eisenhower administration delivered with the help of the Department of State and CIA, which happened to be led by the Dulles brothers, who had strong ties to the company. Arbenz’ ousting put an end to democracy in Guatemala for decades and replaced it by military rule. A civil war followed several years later, resulting in the deaths of over 200,000 people. The country remains one of Latin America’s most impoverished to this day.

And Guatemala is but one of a myriad of countries whose fates have been catastrophically dictated by America’s imperialist interventions. In this film, American author, journalist, and academic Stephen Kinzer explores the formula and rationale the US uses to overthrow governments it doesn’t like, as well as its real motives. As illustrated in Guatemala, Libya, and Hawaii, the people in places whose governments were toppled by US-engineered coups are still dealing with the aftermath many years later.

See Also: (Russia Today) – ‘Don’t go to World Cup or else’: UK media claims Russian hooligans are threatening to kill LGBT fans

Another day and another scare story ahead of football’s World Cup in Russia. British tabloids are claiming that Russian hooligans are threatening to kill gay and transgender fans. Anastasia Churkina takes up the story.

Also: (Russia Today) – ‘We need US troops so they can counter Russia’ – Polish defence minister

Poland is reportedly willing to pay $2bn for permanent presence of US troops in the country. Moscow called the initiative “dangerous”, saying it won’t benefit European security.